Swedish Massage


What is Swedish Massage?

The most commonly used form of classical Western massage, generally performed in the direction of the heart, sometimes with active or passive movement of the joints. It is used especially for relaxation, relief of muscular tension, and improvement of circulation and range of motion.

A massage technique that includes Effleurage, Pétrissage, Friction, Vibration, and Tapotement. The word comes from the French massage “friction of kneading”, or from Arabic massa meaning “to touch, feel” or from Latin massa meaning “mass, dough”, Greek verb (massō) “to handle, touch, to work with the hands, to knead dough”. The ancient Greek word for massage was anatripsis and the Latin was frictio.

Swedish Massage has been around for a long time. It was first created back in 1812 in the University of Stockholm by a physiologist named Henri Peter Ling. Today it is the most well known and popular type of massage therapy.

 

What happens before the treatment/session

In all Swedish massage, the therapist lubricates the skin with massage oil and performs various massage strokes. These movements warm up the muscle tissue, releasing tension and gradually breaking up muscle “knots” or adhered tissues, called adhesions. Swedish massage promotes relaxation, among other health benefits.

Before the massage, the therapist should ask you about any injuries or other conditions that he or she should know about (Contra-indications). Things you would want tell a therapist include areas of tightness or pain, allergies, and conditions like pregnancy. You can also tell them up front if you have a preference for light or firm pressure.

It’s best not to get a massage if you are ill.

After the consultation, the therapist instructs you how to lie on the table — face up or face down, and underneath the sheet or towel — and then leaves the room. He or she will knock or ask if you are ready before entering.

 

How you may feel after a massage.

Most people feel very relaxed. Some experience freedom from long-term aches and pains developed from tension or repetitive activity. After an initial period of feeling slowed down, people often experience increased energy, heightened awareness, and greater productivity which can last for days.

 

The Benefits of Massage.

Massage and bodywork can help release chronic muscular tension and pain, improve circulation, increase joint flexibility, reduce mental and physical fatigue and stress, promote faster healing of injured muscular tissue, improve posture, and reduce blood pressure. Massage and bodywork is also known to promote better sleep, improve concentration, reduce anxiety and create an overall sense of well-being.